Seoul: A cat cafe visit and other adventures

Seoul: A cat cafe visit and other adventures

Besides doing 5 walking tours, here is some of the other things we did, discovered and experienced in Seoul.

The cat cafe

After having some street food on Sunday, we saw someone dressed as a giant cat advertising for a cat cafe. We’re both dog persons and usually I don’t really like cats but going to a cat cafe still sounded like something you should try 🙂 So we headed over there, changed in the stylish slippers they provided, got our hands disinfected, ordered some tea and continued to hang out with 30 cats. Most of them were pretty lazy and didn’t really want to be pet (see happy cat face below), at least not by me. I finally found the fattest and cutest one to snuggle with. I guess it was just too lazy to move 🙂 Thorben found a few more active ones. So it was pretty fun and I think we might go back to one when we visit Jana in Taipei in October.

Cheonggyecheon Stream

There is an 11 kilometer long stream which runs through the city. From what I read it got covered with concrete at one point and a highway was built there. In 2003 the city started to restore it and it was opened again in 2005. It is below street level and there are lots of trees and greens, so it’s nice for a stroll and to cool off your feet in 🙂 We even saw a heron and lots of little fish.

Shopping

Korea and Seoul seem to be very popular for shopping so I kind of felt like we had to experience it a bit. We walked around the streets in Myeongdong and it was pretty cool so see all the stores and adverts. Apparently people in Korea don’t think I’m very cute, at least all the cosmetic stores kept trying to get me to go in with promises of free masks and make-up ;). The only thing I was interested in buying was socks. They had so many fun ones! Sadly Thorben said I could only buy 5 (I admit, after I had already bought 4 pairs, so I got a total of 9).

We also headed across the river to the Times Square mall and walked around a bit. I especially liked the food market (surprise), where they had crazy prices for some of the fruit. 38,000 KRW, that’s 28 Euro, for a watermelon, anyone?

Metro

The metro system is extensive and the stations are massive, even bigger than in Shanghai. One time we accidentally walked to the next station instead of to the tracks, so I guess at least some are also connected underground. Just getting from an entrance to the tracks takes forever, especially when you switch lines. Also, Korea doesn’t seem to believe in escalators so on top of all the walking we did I also climbed about 3864 steps (rough estimate) in the stations.

It looks like the metro stations also serve as bunkers. They were signs outside pointing to the closest entrance and gas masks and supplies everywhere. I guess it’s good to be prepared but I also found it kind of scary. There are also lots of shops and food places down there, so you could probably survive underground for a while.

Other discoveries

When walking around on our first day we somehow stumbled upon a sort of pro war/pro America demonstration. Again, kind of scary.


Dyeing and curling your hair seems very popular, much more than in Shanghai. Most of the old ladies were rocking a perm. There are make-up advertisements everywhere and we saw more than one person recovering from plastic surgery (trying to hide it under face masks).

1 Euro is around 1300 Korean Won, so taking money out at the ATM made me feel super rich 🙂

Of course we also ate in Seoul, but that’s enough material for another post 🙂

 

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